More Clean Jobs For Queensland

20.08.20 By

THE CLIMATE COUNCIL welcomes news that the Queensland government will spend $145 million to unlock renewable energy corridors across North Queensland, Central Queensland and South West Queensland.

“This is a win-win announcement. It will create jobs for Queenslanders while also tackling long term problems like climate change,” said the Climate Council’s CEO Amanda McKenzie.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says there is potential for up to five renewable energy zones in North Queensland with a total of eight across the state.

“This is exactly the sort of announcement that investors are crying out for. In New South Wales we have seen that renewable energy zones attract massive amounts of private investment, which is what is required to get people back to work,” said Ms McKenzie.

Renewable energy zones ensure that clean energy is integrated into the electricity grid in a way that is most efficient and at the lowest possible cost. It smooths the way for the transition to cheap, reliable renewable energy.

“The states and territories are light years ahead of the Federal Government when it comes to tackling climate change and protecting Australians from worsening extreme weather,” said the Climate Council’s Senior Researcher, Tim Baxter.

“Queensland is being battered by climate change. Last summer bushfires scorched rainforests and more recently we have witnessed the third mass bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef in five years,” said Mr Baxter.

“Fortunately, the Sunshine State has the potential to be a renewables powerhouse,” he said.

For interviews please contact Senior Communications Advisor, Lisa Upton on 0438 972 260

The Climate Council is Australia’s leading community-funded climate change communications organisation. We provide authoritative, expert and evidence-based advice on climate change to journalists, policymakers, and the wider Australian community.

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